Tag Archives: featured

A Powerful Superbowl Ad in Spanish – Subtitles in the Wild

If you haven’t seen this PSA that focuses on violence against women, which aired during the superbowl, it’s worth watching.

Eme de Mujer, a website of the largest Uruguayan daily newspaper El País, shared the PSA (with Spanish subtitles) in this recent post.

Screen shot of http://uy.emedemujer.com/actualidad/entretenimiento/el-comercial-del-super-bowl-del-que-todas-debemos-hablar/At Amara, it always excites us to see videos, such as this, shared across cultural and/or in accessible contexts. We’ll continue to keep our eyes peeled and share anything that looks intriguing or neat.

What are Subtitles in the Wild? We’ve been keeping an eye on popular videos with posted on the web with using the Amara embedder – when we see something interesting or exciting, we’ll share it.

An Important Note: Amara blog authors aren’t fluent in every language. If you see any factual errors, cultural faux pas, or have notes or other blog-related ideas to share, please let us know in the comments or at blogs@amara.org We love conversation!

 

NYC Event Tomorrow: Translation-Machination (Feb 27, 2015)

If you’re in NYC tomorrow afternoon, a member of the Amara team will be joining a discussion panel at 3:30 pm, at the NYU event Translation-Machination.

This event explores the changing circumstances of linguistic exchange and considers the implications of translation as a language technology from a media theoretical perspective.

It’s a free event and will no doubt spur some interesting conversation!

Event Time: February 27 1:00pm – 5:00pm EST
Event Location: 239 Greene Street, NY NY
Registration: (free) Bottom of this page.

Amara Newsletter (Feb ’15): A Fashionably Late 2014 Recap

Most orgs did 2014 wrap ups in the first week of January, but that gets a little overwhelming. We’re doing ours fashionably late instead – please enjoy!

Accessibility volunteers, making a difference for others

In 2014, we learned about reddit.com/r/CaptionPlease, an amazing community of accessibility-minded folks who caption short videos for anyone who requests them. They are a friendly community, and are always looking for volunteers – visit the link above for info on getting involved and/or requesting captions.

@SubtitleYouTube has single handedly (double handedly?) captioned a LOT of videos during the year. It’s an inspiring effort, @SubtitleYouTube!

And of course Amara is home to some really neat accessibility groups as well, including the Captions Requested team as well as the Music Captioning team. Definitely worth a look.

Are there other volunteer accessibility communities we should point to? Please let us know!

Amara platform development in 2014

2014 was a HUGE year for Amara development! Here are a few highlights: Amara Editor and Embedder both went gold, the website speed and performance massively improved, we did a full integration with Vimeo. The improvements will continue in 2015!

Translation highlights from 2014

Volunteers rallied around Aaron Schwartz’s story, translating the feature film into over 12 languages and helping spread this imporant story worldwide.

Attitude Live, an amazing nonprofit organization, produces compelling stories about people living with disabilities. Their volunteer community translated an inspiring video about a woman named Maia Amai into 20 languages. The video tell’s Maia’s story, where she overcomes significant adversity to join the New Zealand wheelchair rugby team.

Another group of translators made Scientific American’s what happens when you die video available in over 24 languages (which has since gone very viral in Hungary!). Overall, we saw a LOT of fun and inspiring videos translated into all kinds of languages.

And every year we give a big shout out to the TED Open Translation Project, which continues to grow and evolve at an astonishing rate.

Do you have any inspiring translation stories we should be sharing? Please let us know!

Design in 2014: Websites, blog, and new tutorial video

We launched two beautiful new website designs: Amara.org and Amara’s Professional Services Site, in addition to a cute and informative Meet Amara video. The Amara Blog also got a facelift and we’ve been posting there more regularly.

To sum it all up, we’re pumped about 2015! If you’ve been thinking about video accessibility or translation, please drop us a line (just reply to this email).

Best,
The Amara Team

Corrections: We mistook @SubtitleYoutube’s account name (though the link was correct).

Every Frame a Painting & Satoshi Kon – Subtitles in the Wild

Satoshi Kon, acclaimed director, animator, screenplay writer, and  manga artist, made an impact on filmmakers around the world. In this video, YouTube channel Every Frame a Painting, dissects some of the unique techniques and ideas that Kon pioneered. The video also reviews specific points of influence Kon had in other filmmakers’ films.

Daily News Agency, a Japanese aggregator of news, tech, food, and media, featured the video (with Japanese subtitles) in this recent post.

Screenshot of japanese site dailynewsagency.com with Kon articleAt Amara, it always excites us to see videos, such as this, shared across cultural contexts. We’ll continue to keep our eyes peeled and share anything that looks intriguing or neat.

What are Subtitles in the Wild?  We’ve been keeping an eye on popular videos with posted on the web with using the Amara embedder – when we see something interesting or exciting, we’ll share it.

An Important Note: Amara blog authors aren’t fluent in every language. If you see any factual errors, cultural faux pas, or have notes or other blog-related ideas to share, please let us know in the comments or at blogs@amara.org We love conversation!

 

Womany.net & Emma Watson – Subtitles in the Wild

Late last year, at the United Nations, Emma Watson gave an impassioned speech about the launch of HeForShe, a project she’s spearheading along with UN Women. HeForShe calls for everyone to stand behind the concept of gender equality as a human rights issue.

Womany.net recently featured the Watson speech in a blog post and the video has been getting lots of views in Traditional Chinese. The site appears to be Chinese (possibly Taiwanese?) and has some focus on women’s issues.

Screenshot of Emma Watson video embedded in Womany.net

At Amara, it always excites us to see videos, such as this, shared across cultural contexts. We’ll continue to keep our eyes peeled and share anything that looks intriguing or neat.

What are Subtitles in the Wild?  We’ve been keeping an eye on popular videos with posted on the web with using the Amara embedder – when we see something interesting or exciting, we’ll share it.

An Important Note: Amara blog authors aren’t fluent in every language. If you see any factual errors, cultural faux pas, or have notes or other blog-related ideas to share, please let us know in the comments or at blogs@amara.org We love conversation!

The EASY way to purchase captions or translations for Vimeo videos

This guide shows how to instantly get a quote, plus purchase captions or translations for any video you’ve uploaded to Vimeo. This functionality is integrated directly into Vimeo.com, for your convenience.

Step 1. Your Video Page

Ensure you’re logged in to Vimeo and then visit the video page (on Vimeo.com). Click the Settings button, then the Advanced button, and finally the Purchase button, as shown in this animation:

An animated image, showing video page, settings page, and advanced settings pages.

 

Step 2. Original Language

When you click the purchase button, you’ll be prompted for the spoken language in your video. In other words, if your video has English dialog, you would pick English on this first screen:

First screen of Vimeo purchase flow

 

Step 3. Captions or Translations

Next, you’ll decide if you just want original language captions (the option on the left) or captions with translations (the option on the right).

screenshot showing caption and translation buttons

 

Step 4. Services, Pricing Quote, Check Out

If you’re only purchasing captions, you’ll have a variety of service levels to pick from. You can use the Amara Editor for polishing up the final output.

If you’re purchasing translations, we’ll automatically pick the best captions possible, which is how we ensure the highest quality of translation.

Once you’ve made your quality and/or language selections, you can see the total price in the sidebar. Click the Check out button to finalize your purchase.

check out button

Step 5. Work in Progress

The work is started immediately, plus you should get an email confirmation. As soon as work is finished, you’ll get another email notification. The delivery time will depend on the length of your video, plus the services you chose.

Work in progress screenshot

Step 6. Enabling Captions & Translations

Once work is finished, you can enable the subtitles via the same Advanced Settings page for your video. Check the box on the left to enable the subtitles.

screenshot: enable subtitles area

Don’t forget to scroll to the bottom of this page and click the Save Changes button!

screenshot: save changes button

Note: If you requested to review finished captions, before they are sent to Amara for translation, you’ll do that in this area as well – just follow the prompts.

Step 7. Viewing Your Captions & Translations

Once you’ve got subtitle tracks enabled, go to your video page and you should see a CC logo on the bottom right corner of the video.

Viewers simply click the CC logo to access available languages.

screenshot: CC button on video player